Have a Go at Watersports for £10 or Less

Posted on April 24, 2018 @ 4:57 PM in AdventureCanoeing

Make a splash and try something new this May as part of Get Wet NI 2018. Clubs from across Northern Ireland are offering watersport sessions for just £10 or less on Sat 19th & Sun 20th May. With no experience necessary and all of the equipment provided, there has never been a better time to get out on the water!


Below are just a few thrilling events you can try:

For the Adrenaline Junkies

Learn to Waterski / Wakeboard with the Experts, Meteor Water Ski Club, Lough Henney, Bresagh Road, Sun 20th May
Guaranteed to get the heart pounding, try water skiing or wake boarding in a safe and controlled environment. 

Ladies Beginner Wakeboarding LessonsKnockbracken Reservoir, Carryduff, BT8 8BP, Sat 19th & Sun 20th May
Get into wakeboarding during a one on one coaching session which will soon have you gliding across the longest cable wakeboarding run in Ireland!

Fun with Friends

Rowing Taster SessionsRiver Lagan, Stranmillis Mooring Dock, Governors Bridge, Belfast, Sat 19th and Sun 20th May
Row a community-built traditional currach and see Belfast and the river Lagan from a different perspective. Suitable for all ages and abilities. This session will teach you basic rowing techniques and you'll try your hand at steering. 

Have a go Rowing in Kircubbin, Kircubbin Sailing Club, 106 Shore Road, Kircubbin, Sat 19th and Sun 20th May
Improve your fitness and have the option of participating as a rower, cox or support member.

Have a go Rowing in Dundrum, Dundrum Inner Bay, Slipway opposite Dundrum Inn, Sat 19th and Sun 20th May
Row with the current world champions and see if coastal rowing could be your thing.

Skiff Rowing for Beginners, Killyleagh at the Netwalk, Sun 20th May
A fun filled session with excellent coaching from experienced team members. This event is a fantastic opportunity to meet new friends while learning to row and exploring Strangford Lough. Everyone that enjoys this activity will have an opportunity to train for the Strangford Skiff Festival.

Try Rowing with Lagan Scullers Club, River Lagan, Lockview Road, Belfast, Sun 20th May
Rowing / sculling taster session for beginners, with some sessions specifically for women over 16 years old. Learn the basics of rowing indoors before taking to the water to see Belfast from the river.

A Family Day Out


Summer Splash Event For FamiliesCreggan Country Park, Westway, Derry, Sat 19th & Sun 20th May
This family fun event will involve canoeing, kayaking, paddle boarding and a session on inflatables. It's a great opportunity to get everyone out on the water at a special half price rate.

Dip Your Toe – Have a Go, Lough Erne, Broadmeadow, Lakeland Forum Leisure Centre, Sat 19th May
Get your family (or some friends) together to join a crew of 10 to row through Enniskillen aboard this fascinating bronze age boat currach boat.

Free Taster Youth Rowing Sessions on Strangford Lough, Strangford Lough, Leaving from Cook Street, Portaferry, (located along shore road BT22 1LB), Sat 19th & Sun 20th May
Free rowing sessions for boys and girls aged 11 to 17 years old on Strangford Lough.

Push the Boat Out


Push the Boat Out – Try Free Sailing, Kayaking and Coastal Rowing, County Antrim Yacht Club, 1 Marine Parade, Whitehead, BT38 9QP, Sat 19th May
County Antrim Yacht Club's annual taster day. Try a range of watersports with experienced guides during 20-30 minute sessions. A family fun day will also be taking place, including face painting and a BBQ.

Push the Boat Out with Strangford Lough Yacht Club, Strangford Lough Yacht Club, Whiterock, Sun 20th May
A fun and sociable introduction to sailing with the option of a BBQ afterwards.

Push the Boat Out – Introduction to Dinghy and Cruiser Sailing, Carlingford Lough Yacht Club Killowen Point, Rostrevor, Sun 20th May
A great opportunity to take a dinghy or a yacht out for an afternoon! You can even take a spin in a RIB or have a go stand up paddleboarding.

Follow us on Facebook to keep up to date with what's happening across Northern Ireland's waterways or check out our website, GetWetNI.com

Ethan Loughrey
Ethan Loughrey  Mountain Bike Officer

Hardest thing about Mountain Biking? Definitely the trees.

Welcoming Synge and Byrne Café to Rostrevor MTB Trails

Posted on April 10, 2018 @ 10:53 AM in Mountainbiking

Rostrevor MTB Trails recently saw the opening of a new café at it's trailhead. Synge and Byrne is a well established chain across Northern Ireland, and their promise of awesome food, great coffee and outstanding customer service is already being well received by the MTB community. We spoke to Damien Garvey, Director / Pot Washer in Chief of Synge and Byrne about the nitty gritty of opening a cafe at a MTB Trailhead.  

 

Hi Damien, congrats on the new move and thanks for speaking to us! What do you think makes Kilbroney such an attractive place for a café like Synge and Byrne?

As a brand we are committed to Northern Ireland and the best it has to offer, providing healthy choices and engaging in a better working life - so Kilbroney and its world class MTB trails, amazing environment and what it gives to the community and visitors couldn’t sit better with the values of our brand. That and the numbers of thirsty and hungry visitors that arrive every day!

How aware were you of the MTB trails before the move?

Being a local business and the fact that one of the owners is a World Champion Level Iron Man competitor, biking and the local biking scene is quite high on our agenda, so we have been regular visitors to the trails in the winter months since (the café) opened….roadies during the dryer brighter months.

 

Mountain bikers have been known to enter a café with mud and rain dripping from them. Is that a pain or something to be embraced?

That was a frightening prospect at the beginning and we did worry about having some softer seating, but we have used fabrics that can deal with quite a high level of abuse. Besides, they might be a dirty bunch but they have great manners normally and so sit on the hard chairs when they are filthy... usually! So no issue really, every site has its particular challenges and a bit of dirt is fine as the dirty guys are usually the ones that are really hungry.

Have you or any of your staff been out on the MTB trails yet? If so, what did you / they think?

As we said we have been out on the trails a number of times and we have a semi-pro turning pro on our payroll, Jack Devlin and he thinks the trails are the best. If he isn't charming the customers in our Boucher Road branch he is shedding the trails in Rostrevor…. a man with his head screwed on!

 

What would you say is the perfect feed for a MTBer having just come in from taking on the 27km loop?

Definitely one of our Roast sandwich specials. Slow Honey Roast Ham, mustard mayo, rocket on a Corn Dolly award winning bap served up with Sweet potato fries, Zingy Slaw and Pesto Mayo Dipping Sauce... probably followed by a Serious coffee and some chocolate, homemade Caramel Square maybe. The best in the country, Fact!

 

What’s a healthy treat you’d suggest for mountain bikers?

I didn’t know mountain bikers did healthy I thought that was for the runners & roadies! On the occasion they are out with their other half and trying to impress I would say one of our “Bliss Balls” – vegan, Gluten Free, additive free, made locally buy the lovely Lisa and simply delicious washed down with one of our range of Green teas……and back the next day for the S&B Breakfast!!

 

Quick fire round:

Favourite film?

The Secret Life of Walter Mitty

 

TV show you’re currently into?

G.O.T……the only one and we get to watch them filming in the beautiful Mournes.

 

Favourite food?

Our own Caramel Squares…..that’s why we bike!

 

Favourite song at the minute?

BB King “Better not Look Down” (not current I know but on repeat in the store at the minute)

 

Worst injury you’ve picked up?

Thankfully just the nasty pussy scrapes and cuts that come with using your ass for brakes on tarmac while clad in Lycra only! One of the team has had the whole Airlift job for a broken leg while competing in the Cooley Thriller a couple of years ago….nasty!

 

Anything else you’d like to share with the MTB community?

Just that we have a café in Slieve Gullion Forest Park and although you have to get yourself to the top it is a real undiscovered gem that should not be missed. Although there are no structured MTB trails ther...yet!

 

Thanks for chatting to us Damien!

Synge and Byrne at Kilbroney are open 9am - 5pm daily. They also currently have cafés in Dungannon, Newtownabbey, Newry, Derry/Londonderry, Belfast and Slieve Gullion. Rigorous food sampling took place prior to this interview. It was delicious.

 

Ethan Loughrey
Ethan Loughrey  Mountain Bike Officer

Hardest thing about Mountain Biking? Definitely the trees.

Top Tips For Walking As A Family In Northern Ireland

Posted on April 9, 2018 @ 5:19 PM in Walking

We are spoilt for choice when it comes to picturesque walking locations in Northern Ireland. In this blog Kelly Hargie, author of 'Every Treasure', shares some of her tops tips for getting your family out exploring.

Family Friendly Walks Northern Ireland

My husband, Trevor, and I, along with our 3 boys aged 7, 9 and 12 go hiking most weekends and enjoy camping during school holidays. We love nothing more than exploring, the rich pickings that Northern Ireland has on offer and never cease to be amazed, by the unspoiled hidden gems and beautiful landscapes we get to savour as the seasons change.

We have been doing this ever since our children were very small, before the youngest could walk he came with us in a baby backpack carrier; and over the years, our out-and-about adventures have become the highlight of our week. With modern life being so busy with the work and school routine, we really look forward to this carved-out family time. There are places that we like to visit time and time again and walks that hold special memories for us.

Some things we have learned along the waybig

Planning an arduous hike up Slieve Bearnagh in the Mourne Mountains mid-winter with toddlers, is always going to be a little bit over-ambitious. It is important to plan-out journeys well in advance, keeping in mind the abilities of everyone in the group. Ultimately, hiking as a family is all about having fun and developing your child's love for walking! Sure, set goals once a bit of experience has been tucked under the belt, but be realistic and make sure everyone has a good time. 

small

While not thinking too big, it's also worth not thinking too small! Kids are way more capable than we sometimes give them credit for. It is our youngest child, or as we like to call him ‘our little mountain goat’ who is always the first to reach the top of a mountain and add his stone to the cairn. Challenges are good, it’s all about being sensible and planning well. 

Money

The joy of walking is that it costs virtually nothing, beyond the price of a pair of walking boots and a small picnic. At the end of a day of hiking in the Mournes, we often talk among ourselves about what a great day out we have had for less than £10. Many family-focused activities can end up costing parents a small fortune. Exploring a nature trail, splashing in muddy puddles and learning about the natural world with kids is satisfying in so many ways and doesn’t require re-mortgaging the house in the process.

Finding The Time

Not all outdoor expeditions need to be time-consuming. There are some quality walks that can be done in just a couple of hours. Again, it often comes down to the planning: put clothes out and prepare a picnic the night before, or go out for a walk in your local area to avoid long travel times. Whatever your time-frame, I guarantee that a journey into the wild is totally achievable!

equipment

As mentioned above, other than a decent pair of walking boots and some waterproof, warm and comfortable clothes, there’s not a whole lot more equipment required to go walking. Most routes around forests and parks are clearly marked out but should you need them maps can be downloaded from the internet too.

ducks

If we only went adventuring during good weather, life would be dull and cabin fever would most certainly ensue. It’s well-known and joked about that Northern Ireland often gets to experience all 4 seasons in a day. It is just as possible to walk in the colder winter months as it is in the bright days of spring and summer. Certainly, the number of daylight hours is fewer, but to be honest, some of the best adventures we have experienced as a family have been in the snow and rain! Is there anything better than arriving home after a strenuous, chilly walk to a warm house and hot chocolate? I think not.

Family Friendly Walks Northern Ireland

The Essentials 

So, you’re ready to get the family out-and-about exploring and savouring some quality time together, the next thing you want to know is what exactly do you need to bring?

Food, and plenty of it! If your kids are anything like mine they like to graze all day long. Bring snack-type foods that can be eaten on the go and that also have a decent amount of nutritional value. We like to bring hard-boiled eggs, lots of fruit and a few treats are usually worth packing for a bit of encouragement when little legs get tired. 

With our erratic weather and the fact that the top of a mountain can be very different from the bottom of a mountain, it is worth wearing layered clothing. Think base-layers, t-shirt, fleece and a waterproof. I would advise popping spare socks in the rucksack and keep a full set of spare clothes in the car. Hats, gloves and snoods are useful to have at hand as the wind can be strong even on a mild day. 

Toilet roll, carrier bags / a small spade are essential when trekking with children too. You know for sure that the moment you are deep in the woods or halfway up a mountain trail someone will need the loo! And usually when kids say they need to go, well, they really need to go! It is possible to discretely toilet in the wild like Bear Grylls.

Family Friendly Walks Northern Ireland

Use Your Imagination!

Hiking with the kids is a whole heap of fun, I love it more than anything. The pace can be slow, but there is so much to explore! Spend an entire day looking for fossils on the coast, studying bugs in the forest or foraging for leaves to use in a craft activity when you get home. Life is busy and learning to slow-down, breathe-deep and enjoy our beautiful countryside can be so beneficial. I’ve learned over the years of walking with my kids that it is in their favourite wild spaces that imagination comes alive. Play a made-up game, go off the beaten track, climb a tree, dance in the rain, jump in the mud. There is so much fun to be had if we allow kids to take the lead and set the tone.

As the good weather arrives, I hope that you are inspired to get out and about exploring the multitude of walks on offer in Northern Ireland. The benefits of a walk in the great outdoors cannot be counted or even at times put into words. Go for it; pull on your walking boots, pack up a few sandwiches and get out there and explore! I promise you will not be disappointed at what you discover!

Feeling inspired? Here are some Family Friendly Walks

Family Friendly Walks Northern Ireland

The Giant's LairSlieve Gullion, Co. Armagh (1 mile walk)
Capture the whole families imagination discovering a land with dragons, giants and fairies. At just over a mile with uphill sections there are lots of fairy houses and art features to explore on this very enjoyable and achievable walk.

Cranny Falls, Carnlough, Co. Antrim (2.4 mile walk)
With a fantastic eco-playpark at the beginning of the trail and a gentle incline to the waterfall it is well-worth a visit.

Hen Mountain, Mourne Mountains, Co. Down (5.9 miles walk)
A great little mountain for those wishing to start hiking in the Mournes. This walk is more suited to those with older children or with younger children in a backpack carrier.

Cave Hill, Belfast, Co. Antrim (4.5 mile walk)
A well-known and well-loved walk in the Belfast hills, it's a fun game trying to identify buildings from the top. Those with younger children or off-road buggies can explore the forest section below.

Gortin Lakes, Omagh, Co. Tyrone (0.6 mile walk)
This short off-road walk leads around Gortin Lakes with superb views of the Sperrins landscape. Just under a mile in length spend a couple of hours exploring and enjoy a picnic in the tranquil surroundings.

Tollymore Forest Park (River Trail), Bryansford, Co. Down (3 mile walk)
Journey into deep woods following the trail alongside the River Shimna before hopping over a set of stepping stones. Families with younger kids can explore shorter sections of this walk and the 'Big Deer' play area.

Castlewellan Forest Park, Castlewellan, Co. Down (Various walks of up to 3 miles)
There are lots of walks to enjoy in Castlewellan Forest Park. Families looking a challenge should explore the Slievenaslat Walk while those with buggies and younger children can explore the Lakeside Walk. Finish the day exploring  'Animal Wood' play area & Peace Maze. 

Whitepark Bay, Ballintoy, Co. Antrim (2.8 mile walk)
With archaeological evidence everywhere this is the ideal location to spend a few hours fossil hunting. This beach is also the ideal spot for a quiet picnic lunch. 

Discover more family friendly walks on WalkNI.com

Family Friendly Walks Northern Ireland

*Remember - take all of your rubbish home with you. Take a million and one pictures and wonderful memories home with you and leave behind nothing but footprints. It is also worth checking route descriptions beforehand if you are planning to take your dog. Some routes go through working farmland where dogs are not permitted.

Kelly Hargie
Kelly Hargie  Blogger (Every Treasure)

Kelly Hargie is a Belfast-based Mum of 3 adventurous boys. Her hobbies are reading, walking and eating good food. She blogs over at Every Treasure about the silver-lining moments to be found in the everyday and is passionate about authentic-living, simplicity and will always leave housework undone to go on an outdoor adventure.

Castleknock CC's Journey to the Giant's Causeway Coast Sportive

Posted on March 29, 2018 @ 3:12 PM in Cycling

We've always been fasincated by all of the small stories that go on in the background in the lead up to the Giant's Causeway Coast Sportive. This year we've got an ear to the ground with one cycling club from Dublin. Noelle and Mark will be keeping us up to date on all their preparations from now right the way until the big day on September 8th. Follow along and share your own stories on the Giant's Causeway Coast Sportive Facebook page!


Mark and Noelle: Saturday 12th May

Welcome back! So what a day we got for the Castleknock Cycling Club 100km to the Hill of Tara, someone knew we meant business. It was glorious. There was staggered departure times so that we would all arrive roughly around the same time to Maguire’s Café for tea and scones at the Hill of Tara (10:50)  – needles to say I was in the elite group! We started at 8:15 – figure out which group I was in!

22km/hr group departure 08:15

24km/hr group departure 08:40

26km/hr group departure 08:50

28km/hr group departure 09:00

So Kathleen took the helm of our group of 10 as the leader, which was great as she runs a steady ship and keep things moving. John who was out for a while with an injury also joined us for some of the cycle, it was great to see him back with us on Saturday.

The route took us through Dunboyne, Summerhill, Dunsany, and Kilmessan and onto the Hill of Tara. The roads were relatively quite most of the way. Spring has finally arrived; the country has gone ‘green’ over night. In Meath I noticed a lot of cattle out grazing, as a farmer’s daughter great to see, the poor animals were in for too long over the winter.

55 cyclists descended on Maguire’s Café around 10:50 and thanks to the great organisation by CCC’s event’s coordinator, Fiona Reidy, we were all fed and watered within 20 minutes. It was really nice for all the different groups to meet here and just relax and have a chat. Andrew drove from Castleknock to take some pics of us and see we all arrived alive! and Jim Healy drove up to give some mechanical support where needed. Prior to departure there was the obligatory photo shoot of the group and then we all set off back home. At this stage we had 52 km complete before we set off again, good to have the back broken of it so to speak. On the way back we acquired 2 extra cyclists, Roisin and Clare and lost 1 to the 24km group – Martin couldn’t keep up with us! Fiona, Kathleen and Jackie also took their own route home as a group of 3. Now Roisin stepped up to the plate as leader and did a fine job taking us through Skryne, Ratoath, Fleenstown, Mulhuddart and back to base – Insomina in Carpenterstown for more tea and scones. On arrival here we had completed 100km on the nose.

So to recap it was a fantastic day, so well organised and every one in great form.

Oh I also was wearing a better pair of cycling shorts – made me notice the sunny day more!

 

Mark and Noelle: Saturday 28th April 

A huge gang of about 25 of us assembled in the Carpenter car park ready to take advantage of the almost perfect weather conditions which were dry and bright but slightly cold so it was hard to decide on the right amount of layers for the cycle. The 22k group were heading towards Kilcock, Summerhill and then  back through Dunboyne. The 24K group was heading towards Kilteel via Athgoe and back through Celbridge and Lucan. I decided to go out with the 24k group which was being lead by Erick who did a fantastic job of keeping everyone safe.

In total there were 12 of us in the 24K group we started at a good pace that we were all comfortable with. We went out past Lucan to Newcastle and onto Athgoe. As always everyone found the hill at Athgoe to be quite challenging. The climb helped everyone to get nicely warmed up and on the decent we took in some amazing views over Dublin City. We again had another challenging hill as we made our way up towards Kilteel and we stopped for a quick sip of water at the top and allowed everyone to catch their breath.

As we worked our way back to Celbridge we had a few other climbs that caught us by surprise...I think by the time we got Celbridge I think the group were happy to know there were no more hills on the route. In total we had 600 meters of climbing which is pretty respectable for a 70K cycle. We made our way back via Lucan golf club and Erick had one more surprise in store for us...a climb up Somerton Lane which spent the last of any energy that we had left!!

Overall really nice challenging route with a nice mix of hills and views over Dublin and a great bunch to do it with.

 

Mark and Noelle: Saturday 7th April

Again we had fine conditions starting off our cycle and the numbers were great we had around 25 of us assembled in the carpenter pub car park ready to get going. Again we split into 4 groups but this time most people opted to go with the 24k group so that had to be further divided into two groups of 7 cyclists. Both the 22K and 24K groups were heading towards Kilbride and Rathoath doing a 50K spin and the 26 and 28k groups had a longer and more challenging 86K spin heading out towards Maynooth, Kilcock and Enfield. 

 

This week I headed out with the 24K group and we started out at a solid pace out past the Blanchardstown centre and heading towards Hollystown. Although it was not raining the ground was a little wet so we had careful to be on roundabouts ect.

We had the wind in our faces as we headed out the Rathoath road so we kept in a tight formation and changed the leader to keep the good pace we had going. We ran into the other 24K group as they were heading in the same direction as us, the roads were also busy with other groups of cyclists. We managed to avoid any mechanical mishaps this week but we did take one or two wrong turns which did slow us down a little. Crossing over the M3 motorway we passed along the back of the airport which is well known for being a hard drag with a strong head wind so that took the last of our energy.

 

Overall a really enjoyable cycle with a good bunch and a nice route through Meath and North Dublin. The weather seems to have changed at last and as a group there a feeling the maybe the eternal winter is over and that we can now get going with some long spins. Rumour has it we are going to go for our first adventure to the Dublin mountains next week, that will be a great test for our fitness early in the year.

 

 

Mark and Noelle: Saturday March 24th

Following a few weeks of inactivity due to adverse weather conditions the numbers signing up for this weeks spins were huge. There was almost 25 of us assembled outside the carpenter ready to enjoy the bright but cold weather. We were split into four groups a 22K, 24K and two 26K (as we had reached the limit of 12 persons per group for that speed). So under instruction from our spin leaders we set off. All of us were heading for Kildare the 22s and 24s were heading towards Maynooth-Straffin and then back through Celbridge covering 55K in total. Both 26s were heading out over the n7 towards Athgoe and back also through Celbridge covering a distance just shy of 70K. 

I was with the second of the 26K groups being headed up by our fearless spin leader Tom who kept us safe and sound. We started out at a strong pace to keep the cold at bay, after going through Lucan and Newcastle we hit Athgoe. What I didn't know was that just outside Athgoe there is a huge hill that drags for a good 500 meters. After a serious workout getting to the top we took a much needed break for a few minutes to get some food and liquids in. I was dead last to the top of the hill- a few weeks off the bike was really taking its toll on me and I was lagging at the rear of the group. We had another break when one of our team had a puncture just outside of Clane however with some expertise and the use of some modern toys (i.e pocket gas) we were back on the road less than 10 minutes later.  

 

Coming back through Maynooth we caught up with the 22s and 24s and we all got to the coffee shop at about the same time for a cappuccino. Overall a very enjoyable spin with bright but cold conditions and a good marker for this time of year.

Mark and Noelle: 17th March 18

So today our organised spin was cut from 50km to 33km due to the snowing / sleety conditions ...not that I was complaining! Our Irish winter seems to want to take an extended holiday here and doesn’t want the sun to come out.

So 2 great leaders took the reigns today - Brian and Tony. They kept a tight ship and got us 8 "hardy bucks"around safely.
It was real cold but must say very enjoyable and the tea after was so welcome.

Again I’m not wearing the correct gear and a lot of comments on my inadequate shorts being short and not long so deffo need to get that sorted.

 

Mark and Noelle: 15th March 18:

So tonight we had our first meeting to organise the 'Castleknock Cycling Club’s' weekend away to Antrim for the 'Giant’s Causeway Coast Sportive' on the 08 Sept 18.


The meeting was headed up by a proud Kerry woman who had 7 diligent attendees. Tasks were divided out accordingly and I and my Mayo counterpart got tasked with organising the quiz for the weekend away. I love quizzes not that I’m any good, just nosey!

We had a gear fitting also post our meeting. There was all sizes of any thing stretchy with loads of padding. I myself am taking the plunge, splash out as you may and going to invest in a proper pair of club cycling shorts so after that there’s no stopping me, Antrim here I come!

We'll update this page with all of the club's antics as the big day comes closer. If you'd like to keep us updated on what your club is doing coming up to the big day, we'd love to hear from you! Email us to info@cycleni.com and tell us your plans.

Noelle Rohan
Noelle Rohan  Cyclist with Castleknock Cycling Club

Ulster Way Highlights- The Causeway Coast Way

Posted on March 9, 2018 @ 10:45 AM in Walking

Take a walk along Northern Ireland's most celebrated coastline: voted walkers 'Favourite Coastal Walk' in the 2017 WalkNI Awards. High cliffs, secluded beaches and numerous historic and natural landmarks are just some of the treats on offer along this section of the Ulster Way

Ulster Way Highlights

This 33-mile long linear route from Portstewart to Ballycastle in Co. Antrim is marvellously varied and can be explored in two days or in smaller sections depending on your length of stay. With frequent access points and terrain suitable for fit walkers, this is one route you'll remember for years to come.

Causeway Coast Way

Walking The Causeway Coast Way

Ulster Way Highlights

Day 1: Portstewart to the Giant's Causeway, 15 miles

Starting from the bustling seaside town of Portstewart, the route follows a popular stretch of path to Portrush. A long, sweeping beach and a medieval castle are highlights as you leave these Victorian seaside resorts towards Portballintrae. The next section of trail is entirely off-road, bringing you along a beach and onto high, wild coastline that characterises the middle part of this long-distance route. 

Day 2: The Giants Causeway Ballycastle 18 miles

The second day of walking picks up the trail at the Giant's Causeway and follows the cliff path. This section of trail offers a phenomenal bird’s-eye view of the UNESCO World Heritage Site from the Causeway's 100ft high coastal cliffs. You may wish to make a slight detour by following the 'Shepherd Steps' towards the sea and the infamous lava-formed columns. The trail from this point changes to grassy paths along cliff tops and over the route's highest point. Points of interest include sea caves, harbours used in Game of Thrones and Carrick-a-rede Rope Bridge. From this point the walk follows a diversion to the finish in Ballycastle (please note some walkers choose to finish the route at the rope bridge to avoid the section of road).

Where To Stay

Ulster Way Highlights- Where to stay

There are a wide range of walker friendly accommodation options along the Causeway Coast Way. We recommend choosing one place to stay and availing of transport on each day of your walk. More accommodation information can be found on pg.17 of the Causeway Coast Way Guide.

Where To Eat

Ulster Way Highlights- Where to eat

After a long day walking, some good food and delicious coffee is a must! The Causeway Coast has a wealth of restaurants and cafes that serve high quality, home cooked and locally produced food. Along the trail, why not stop off at Mini Maegden for a delicious grilled cheese sandwich and hot chocolate or call into Bothy Coffee near White Park Bay. For a full list of where to eat on the Causeway Coast please visit www.heartofthecausewaycoastandglens.com and www.northcoastni.com

Getting Around

There are several ways you can travel around the Causeway Coast ideal for those who wish to base themselves in one location and avoid the hassle of carrying large rucksacks.

Translink have a number of bus services running on this route throughout the year. An additional 'Causeway Rambler' service is added in the summer months. Check out the Translink Journey Planner for more information. There are also several taxi companies in this area who can be booked as a pick up and drop off service each day. For contact details on all of the above check out Pg.19 of the Causeway Coast Way Guide.

Please be aware that this walking route passes through areas of open land such as hillside, working farmland and working forests. Livestock may be present, ground conditions may be uneven or wet underfoot and all forestry signage should be adhered to. Please refer to the ‘Walk Safely and Responsibly’ Guide.

Although this walk is waymarked walkers are always advised to carry the relevant map and ensure they are prepared for changeable weather.

You can read our previous blogs in the series here: 'Ulster Way Highlights- The Mourne Way', 'Ulster Way Highlights- The Sliabh Beagh Way'.

Latest comment posted by Alan Sharp on July 1, 2018 @ 9:26 AM

I am not sure that the lava columns near the Giant's Causeway should be described as 'infamous'. What infamy have they committed? Read more >

Jayne Woodrow
Jayne Woodrow  Marketing Officer & Active Clubs Coordinator for Walking

Jayne joined the marketing team of Outdoor Recreation NI in March 2014. She oversees the marketing and communication on WalkNI, OutdoorNI and Walking in Your Community Project. Most recently she has been working with Parkrun Ireland & UK to introduce the 'Walk @ parkrun' initiative.

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